Junko Yoshida is an 18-year veteran of high-tech journalism, having served as a correspondent, bureau chief, and consumer electronics editor for EE Times in Tokyo, Silicon Valley, and Paris. Her wide range of expertise in various technology disciplines, combined with her experience in consumer electronics, has allowed her to trace breakthrough developments in numerous technologies including audio/visual codes, digital TVs, DVDs, mobile TV, RFIDs, and many others. Prior to joining EE Times in 1990, Yoshida served as a principal liaison with the foreign press in Tokyo, where she organized press junkets for groups of journalists from abroad. She started her career with EE Times as the Tokyo Correspondent for the US-based weekly newspaper. She has won various editorial awards including the "Best Beat Coverage" in digital consumer electronics. Most recently, she won first place for "Best Exclusive Story" (2002) among all the then CMP-owned publications. Educated in both the United States and Tokyo, Yoshida graduated from Hitotsubashi University with a BA in Social Science.

Park Assist for Economy Cars

In hopes of bringing advanced automotive features such as park-assist and blind-spot detection to economy cars, Freescale Semiconductor has teamed up with Broadcom to develop a compact MCU integrated with BroadR-Reach automotive Ethernet PHY. BroadR-Reach is an Ethernet physical layer standard designed for use in automotive connectivity applications. It's promoted by Open Alliance SIG, which…

Marvell to Launch IoT Maker Kit

The semiconductor supplier Marvell in Santa Clara, Calif., rolled out its Kinoma Create JavaScript-powered Internet of Things construction kit Monday, March 10. Marvell said that the software/hardware combined tool kit is designed for “software developers, makers, and designers” to easily start creating connected consumer electronics and their companion apps. The brain behind Kinoma Create is…

Qualcomm LTE IC Makes (Auto-) Grade, But Only in Module

As car OEMs eagerly put together in-vehicle infotainment and telematics systems based on predominantly consumer technologies, the unanswered, and often unasked, question is: Are these consumer chips automotive-qualified? EE Times learned during the International CES in Las Vegas earlier this month that Qualcomm's LTE chips, now making deep inroads as the in-car modem, aren't pre-qualified…

Feature Phones Are Back?

MADISON, Wis. — The mobile market has a strange way of refreshing old products and making them new. A case in point is the so-called Bluetooth dialer. A sleek handset — strangely resembling Nokia's erstwhile candy bar phone but much skinner — is reportedly getting traction in China. Technically, this isn't a phone. Called a…

Disturbed by Superhuman?

“Faster, Higher, Stronger” is a well-known Olympics motto. The noble goal speaks volumes of the eternal human desire for self-improvement. It’s not just athletes who share that goal. We all aspire to be better — smarter and more efficient — in the way we study, work and play.   The big question in my mind…

Auto UI at Digital Cusp

Remember how delighted we were when we first discovered that mobile phones can generate different sound effects? Ironically, many of us chose as our favorite an old telephone ringtone. That was back in the mid- and late 1990s, but our infatuation with mobile handsets has never waned. Fast-forward 20 years. As evidenced at the International…

Qualcomm Unveils Auto Game Plan at CES

It's official. Qualcomm's next trip — beyond smartphones and tablets — will be in a car. The San Diego-based cellular chip giant has come to the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) this week to unveil the company's automotive strategy. In an interview with EE Times, Kanwalinder Singh, senior vice president of business development for Qualcomm…