components, chip industry, trade war, tariffs, U.S., China

Tariffs Eased on Some Electronics Products

The electronics industry is enjoying a short-term reprieve from new U.S. tariffs as the Trump administration delayed the imposition of 15 percent duties on $156 billion worth of Chinese goods, including smart phones, computers and other consumer electronics. While the move may boost holiday-related consumer sales, the 25 percent tariffs on a separate $250 billion…

manufacturing, growth, revenue, profit

Manufacturers Expect Revenue & Profit Boost in 2020

U.S. manufacturers are surprisingly upbeat about their prospects in 2020, anticipating growth in revenue, profitability, imports and exports. The outlook isn’t so positive for employment and capital expenditures, which will remain flat or decline next year, according to the Institute for Supply Management’s semiannual forecast. Manufacturers expect revenue will grow 4.8 percent next year –…

steel, tariffs, contracts

U.S. Manufacturing Contracts as Steel Tariffs Loom Large

 The U.S. manufacturing index contracted for the fourth straight month in November — just as the Trump administration resurrected steel and aluminum tariffs on Argentina and Brazil. Global trade issues, according to the Institute for Supply Management, remain the top cross-industry concern for America’s manufacturers as the year ends.  The ISM’s PMI dropped by 0.2…

women, electronics, leadership

Women in Electronics: Advocates for Professional Development

Non-profit advocacy group Women in Electronics (WE) was formed in 2017 to empower women through networking opportunities; develop them through a virtual leadership program; and celebrate their successes along the way. The organization recently wrapped up its third annual leadership conference and now has 300 members. Jackie Mattox, founder and president of WE and national…

Will a Third Huawei Extension Matter to U.S. Tech?

The U.S. Department of Commerce has again extended the temporary general license (TGL) allowing U.S. tech companies – such as Intel, Micron, Qualcomm and Xilinx — to sell components to Chinese networking giant Huawei Technologies. This is the third such extension since the U.S. government, citing security concerns, added Huawei to its “Entity List” in…