What Electronics Companies Need to Know About Prop 65

Although California’s update to its Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 — Proposition 65–doesn’t appear to impact electronics, experts warn the supply chain must revise its compliance practices or risk the consequences. “Violations often ensnare everyone in that supply chain, and at that point you bring in the lawyers and the toxicologists, and the costs…

How Businesses Can Control Costs in an Uncertain Trade Environment

U.S. trade policies are making headlines as the Trump Administration re-examines international trade agreements and implements tariffs on imported steel and aluminum. Cost increases in raw materials, trade compliance or the transportation of goods disproportionally impact small and midsized businesses, according to research by Freightos, an online freight marketplace. Among companies that import infrequently –…

What the EU’s Data Privacy Rule Means for the Supply Chain

Electronics supply chain professionals have more questions than answers when it comes to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The rule, which protects EU citizens from privacy and data breaches, is viewed as a b2c initiative rather than b2b. However, one expert warns that manufacturers and the supply chain should prepare for GDPR…

Electronics Companies Continue to Lead in Conflict Mineral Compliance

Electronics businesses that believe the so-called “conflict minerals” provision of the U.S. Dodd-Frank Act no longer applies to them should think again. Although SEC Acting Chairman Michael Piwowar recommended in April that the Securities & Exchange Commission not enforce the provision — which requires companies to disclose the origin of tungsten, tin, tantalum and gold…

EU Adopts Conflict Mineral Regulations

The EU this week voted to adopt regulations pertaining to the sourcing of tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold (3TG) from conflicted regions of the world. The regulations, which require supply chain due diligence self-certification of tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold originating in conflict-affected and high-risk areas, are mandatory for smelters and importers of raw materials and…

Sanmina: How an EMS Tackles Conflict Minerals Compliance

Electronics manufacturing services (EMS) providers in many regards resemble OEMs – they design, assemble, ship and even support end products. But the distinctions between the businesses are extremely important, particularly when it comes to matters of compliance. The conflict minerals provision of the Dodd-Frank Act, for example, requires manufacturers to disclose the use of tin,…

Why Barcode Labeling Matters in Electronics, Part 2

The ubiquitous labels that accompany electronics shipments are more complicated than most people imagine. Barcodes on these labels are packed with standard information such as the manufacturer of the product and part number. However, many parties along the supply chain – raw materials suppliers, component manufacturers, distributors, sub assemblers and end-customers—want unique information in barcodes…

Electronics Ranks High in Conflict Minerals Compliance

In a very short period of time the electronics industry has moved from grudging acceptance of the so-called U.S. “conflict minerals” rule to a leadership position in compliance, research concludes. Moreover, companies that have embraced the measure to boycott materials mined in certain regions of the world are driving positive change throughout the supply chain.…