Electronics Companies Continue to Lead in Conflict Mineral Compliance

Electronics businesses that believe the so-called “conflict minerals” provision of the U.S. Dodd-Frank Act no longer applies to them should think again. Although SEC Acting Chairman Michael Piwowar recommended in April that the Securities & Exchange Commission not enforce the provision — which requires companies to disclose the origin of tungsten, tin, tantalum and gold…

electronics, conflict minerals, Africa

How the SEC’s Shift on Conflict Minerals Will Impact Electronics

Portions of the electronics industry are applauding a policy shift toward the so-called “conflict minerals” rule that requires publicly traded U.S. companies to disclose the use of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold (3TG) sourced from war-torn regions of Africa. Acting Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Chair Michael Piwowar has directed agency staff to reconsider how companies…

EU Adopts Conflict Mineral Regulations

The EU this week voted to adopt regulations pertaining to the sourcing of tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold (3TG) from conflicted regions of the world. The regulations, which require supply chain due diligence self-certification of tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold originating in conflict-affected and high-risk areas, are mandatory for smelters and importers of raw materials and…

Conflict Minerals Rule: A Repeal Won’t Kill it

The Conflict Minerals Regulation is here to stay. A part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act signed into law in July, 2010 by then President Barack Obama, the conflict minerals regulation has become a global phenomenon. Despised by many industry associations but publicly embraced by all of the major players in…

Electronics OEMs Advance Responsible Sourcing Initiative

The globalization of the electronics industry has presented both opportunities and challenges for the supply chain. As electronics companies source more raw materials from around the globe, practices associated with the mining of minerals have come under scrutiny. While initiatives such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. have improved conditions in certain regions, such…

Sanmina: How an EMS Tackles Conflict Minerals Compliance

Electronics manufacturing services (EMS) providers in many regards resemble OEMs – they design, assemble, ship and even support end products. But the distinctions between the businesses are extremely important, particularly when it comes to matters of compliance. The conflict minerals provision of the Dodd-Frank Act, for example, requires manufacturers to disclose the use of tin,…

Electronics Ranks High in Conflict Minerals Compliance

In a very short period of time the electronics industry has moved from grudging acceptance of the so-called U.S. “conflict minerals” rule to a leadership position in compliance, research concludes. Moreover, companies that have embraced the measure to boycott materials mined in certain regions of the world are driving positive change throughout the supply chain.…

TE Connectivity: Building a Conflict Minerals Infrastructure

Chicago, Ill. – Due to the new regulations and reform in the US, UK, EU, and APAC, supply chain due diligence and corporate social responsibility is a necessity for corporations. Companies are currently re-working their conflict minerals management programs in order to efficiently address SEC expectations. Enhancing smelter data and verification processes has become a major…