Infographic: Conflict Minerals Trail

Fourteen months from now, the first conflict minerals reports are due to the US Securities and Exchange Commission. The SEC, in August 2012, ruled that US manufacturers and contract manufacturers must disclose any use of conflict minerals that originated in the Congo, where human rights abuses are linked to battles over those minerals. Here's a…

Trade Secrets for Sale

To catch a criminal, you have to think like a criminal. That's what Sherlock Holmes and other super sleuths espouse as a sure-fire method for outthinking perps and anticipating their next move. It works against counterfeiters, thieves, hackers, pirates, and other criminal types. Intellectual property theft accounts for billions of dollars of lost revenue and…

With Counterfeit Components, Buyer Beware

A 2012 study by market research firm IHS found that more than 12 million counterfeit electronics and semiconductor components have entered the distribution chain since 2007, with 57 percent of all counterfeit parts obsolete or end-of-life components. Many of these parts make their way into mission-critical industries, such as defense and aerospace, where a malfunctioning…

Conflict Minerals Resolution for Supply Chain?

The problems technology creates are most often solved with other technological innovations. During this process, not only do existing conflicts get resolved, but new market opportunities emerge and entrenched power brokers are sometimes stripped of the fleeting chokehold they have over the industry. Such a development is happening now in the production of titanium as…

America’s Declared (& Undeclared) Cyberwar

President Barack Obama issued an executive order in mid-February to make it easier for “eligible critical infrastructure” companies and the US government to share information about network attacks. As the international cyberwar heats up, the executive order represents one of several ways the US government is attempting to protect national interests from network attacks and…

Nokia Hit Hard by India Tax Fine

While casually browsing online magazines over the weekend, I came across an article that nearly made me spill my coffee on my keyboard. According to the Register, India has knocked on the door and asked {complink 3847|Nokia Corp.} for 30 billion rupees (nearly $545 million) for irregularities related to tax matters. Nokia says it is…

Ready or Not, RoHS 2 Takes Effect January 2

The European Union's Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) law has forever changed the electronics industry. It has resulted in less hazardous substances being used and safer electronic goods. This law has been so successful it has been mimicked by other countries. China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, India, and the State of California have all followed…

Will EU Penalties Discourage Price Fixing?

The European Commission has fined six LCD giants, including Philips, Samsung, LG, and Panasonic, by imposing an antitrust penalty in excess of 1.4 billion euros (more than $1.8 billion). This figure marks the biggest antitrust penalty the EU has ever imposed. The same companies also paid $1.1 billion in fines in the US a few…

Corporate Taxes: No Safe Haven

The US has been trying to get multinationals based in the US to pay taxes on revenue generated outside of the country for years. Now Europe is going after multinationals, as well. The New York Times reports today that several European nations, particularly France and the UK, are pushing to collect taxes from US companies…