EDI, trade platform

TrueCommerce Levels the EDI Playing Field For Small Businesses

Electronic data interchange (EDI) has been a staple of the electronics supply chain for decades. EDI links are used between component makers, distributors and end-customers to share data crucial to managing the supply chain—price, orders, lead times, availability, transaction records, replenishment signals and more. Historically, though, these links have been customized, meaning partners essentially had…

Why Analysts Are Skeptical About Component Demand

You can’t really blame financial analysts for their skepticism on current component demand. The last time the electronics supply chain took orders at face value the industry was left with $13 billion in semiconductor excess alone. Everyone from component manufacturers through OEMs had to write down or write off millions of dollars’ worth of inventory. At…

Bradley’s Law: Pricing Competitiveness Mirror Supply Chain Influence

A company should expect to pay for a specific electronic device a price commensurate with their Competitiveness within that particular commodity. This Competitiveness is the measure of how the supply chain sees the company – Ken Bradley, Founder & CTO, Lytica Inc. When Ken Bradley founded Lytica in 2005 as a consultancy practice, his primary…

Benchmarking: It Assures Better Pricing

Over the 4 years since Lytica Inc. launched our electronic component benchmarking tool set, we’ve concluded there are 4 reasons why companies don’t benchmark their electronic component expenses for competitiveness. There are assumed to be four reasons why companies don’t benchmark component prices. These are: Comfortable with the status quo Believe they are getting great/better…

Market Price Normalization Improves Competitiveness

When we assess a new client’s spending against market pricing, we usually see a distribution of prices made up of overlapping distributions. A typical example looks like the Competitiveness Profile illustration below. The profile suggests three distributions. The first is a fairly tight distribution of good pricing positioned where half of the distribution is seen…