Rochester Reintroduces Freescale, Intel Processors

Newburyport, Mass. – Rochester Electronics, a fully-authorized manufacturer and distributor of semiconductors, will launch 2015 with the re-introduction of many popular processors from Freescale and Intel. Available now is the Freescale 68020 processor. The full military version of the 68020 will be in production the first quarter of 2015. The 68020 processor was sampled in…

Rochester Electronics Re-introduces Intel 8XC196 MCUs

Newburyport, Mass. – Rochester Electronics is a fully-authorized continuing source for the Intel 8XC196 Family of microcontrollers. Introduced in 1982 as the Intel MCS-96 Family, these MCUs are most commonly used in motor control, modem, printer and pattern recognition applications within embedded systems. In 2007, Intel discontinued this family of microcontrollers, at which point Rochester Electronics…

COTS a Mixed Bag for Defense Spending

The U.S. Department of Defense funding is likely to be one of the ongoing casualties of the government’s budget restraints. Uncertainty around government spending has many program managers pulling back on important battlefield management systems (BMS), according to research firm and consultancy Frost & Sullivan. As defense budgets tighten, research and development (R&D) on BMS…

Transitional EOL Cuts Last-Time-Buy Pains

Semiconductor End-of-Life (EOL) announcements can cause procurement stress and lines-down situations. When an EOL notification is issued, the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) may find themselves in the position of having to make a last-time-buy (LTB) purchase that will cover the duration of its manufacturing and/or in-field maintenance. Customers that have a large timeline disconnect between the EOL…

What happened to ‘Real Men Own Fabs’?

Jerry Sanders III, the oft-quoted, hard-fighting, co-founder and former CEO and chairman of Advanced Micro Devices Inc., who made the chest-thumping statement from which I took the headline for this blog, was right about many things in his long career in the semiconductor market. He was also wrong about a few things. Taking on Intel…